TRIBUTE | Colourful architectural beach accessories

With the beginning of August, the beaches of our coasts are crowded. Nowadays we see horrible beach chairs and old-fashioned beach umbrelas everywhere. Thank God, French design studio 5.5 designers has managed to design a lovely new line of beach products.

Inspired by the iconic architecture of the city-resort La Grande Motte, the designers have reviewed and reinterpreted this village. The resort was entrusted to the architect and philosopher Jean Balladour, who spent twenty years exclusively on this project. The result was an architecture-sculpture made of triangles, truncated circles and trapezes, thus providing a kinetic effect to the place. The city obtained in 2010 the label "20th-century heritage site".

Since 2013, La Grande Motte has been supporting creators willing to revisit and reinterpret the seaside resort with an objective: transcend legacy to make it a living heritage and breeding ground for all artistic creations.This year 5.5 designers expressed their fresh and own vision of the city through a new series of objects. Beach mattresses, parasols, towels, buckets and deck chairs are revisiting this popular lifestyle.

The beach accessories offer vacationers a new experience and create multiple ephemeral installations reacting with the architectural landscape of La Grande Motte. The "beach pyramids" are parasols that resonate with the pyramidal buildings of the city. Meanwhile, the "sand pyramids" are buckets that allow children to reproduce the city’s triangles and play the architects’ apprentices on the beach. The acapulco backrests, on the other hand, offer a smart alternative to the traditional deck chairs and stick firmly on the ground. As for the "towels le Provence", they offer a generous surface on the ground to relax, alone or accompanied. Poseidon mattresses, derived from the bishop’s bonnet and made in polyurethane moss, offer comfort to the feet in the sand. And, finally, the grand mottois tables, made with painted metal, can be anchored to the ground to protect personal belongings from the sand.


Images JULES LANGEARD